24-Hour Free Opioid Hotline | Information & Help for Opiate Addiction & Rehab

Opioid Addiction Hotline & Addiction Help

If you or your loved one has developed an addiction to opioid drugs, it is important to seek treatment as soon as possible. Reaching out can be frightening, but it is one of the most effective ways to start the recovery process. An opioid hotline can help you or a loved one take the first step toward recovering from opioid addiction and preventing possible consequences.

Opioid Addiction Hotline: What to Expect

An opioid hotline is a number where callers can get free information about opioid use and abuse. It is not necessary to have health insurance in order to call and these calls are toll-free. All calls to an opioid hotline are kept strictly confidential and one might choose to remain anonymous.

Opioid addiction hotline representatives know that there is no one-size-fits-all approach to the addiction and rehabilitation process. They will not pressure you or your loved one to undergo treatment or ask you to do something you do not want to do. Instead, they will listen to your story and assist you in navigating the present moment, even if all you need is someone to speak to.

The representative might ask some personal questions, such as about the user’s living space and environment, as well as their physical and mental health. They will use the provided information to evaluate the situation, provide more personalized help, and suggest the best next steps. The responses to these questions will be kept completely private.

Free help for opiate addiction, withdrawal & overdose

Reasons to Call an Opioid Hotline for Help & Guidance

Opioid hotlines are for people who are looking for help, not for people who are in life-or-death circumstances. In case you or your loved one is overdosing or in the midst of a life-threatening situation, dial 911 right away. Local emergency services will respond rapidly and take immediate action.

If your or your loved one’s situation is not life-threatening, but you are ready to seek help, the first step may be to call an opioid helpline. You may be hesitant to call because you are ashamed or embarrassed. However, there is no need to worry since admission navigators are prepared to assist and will not judge you based on your situation or struggles. Reaching out is the first step toward recovery and connecting with others who will assist you in avoiding the long-term consequences of opioid abuse.

You can contact an opioid hotline if you or your loved one are in any of the following situations:1

  • You’re looking for free help for opioid addiction.
  • You need assistance, support, or reassurance.
  • You’re worried that the opioid use has gotten out of hand.
  • You are not able to stop taking opioids on your own.
  • You want to get help but don’t know where to begin.
  • You know someone who is in one of these situations.
  • You suspect someone close to you is abusing, but you’re not sure how or whether to approach them about it.

Is the Opioid Abuse Hotline Really Worth It?

Calling an opioid abuse hotline is certainly an easy way to access all the necessary information. Representatives from opioid addiction hotlines, also known as advisors, operators, or admission navigators, have specialized training to deal with these circumstances.

They may be trained in the proper safety procedures so that they can educate you on the best course of action and provide you with the necessary details, whether you need to find a recovery facility in your region, join a 12-step program, or get a screening or referral.

What Are the Signs of Opioid Addiction & Need for Help

A doctor may diagnose opioid addiction based on a professional evaluation. Someone who is struggling with opioid addiction may not show signs right away. However, over time, there might be indications that they need help. Some of the common signs of opioid addiction are:2

  • The failure to maintain control over the use of opioids.
  • Cravings that are out of control.
  • Changes in sleeping patterns.
  • Drowsiness.
  • Loss of weight.
  • Symptoms of the flu on a regular basis.
  • Reduced libido.
  • Poor hygiene.
  • Changes in exercise routines.
  • Isolation from friends or family.
  • Stealing from friends, relatives, or businesses.
  • New financial challenges.

Medical professionals can provide treatment for opioid abuse. Medicines such as methadone, buprenorphine, or naltrexone, in combination with support programs, may help patients recover.

Do I Need Opioid Addiction Treatment?

If you or your loved one are experiencing any of these signs or situations, as a result of opioid use, it would be wise to contact an opioid addiction hotline. Occasional consumption may eventually lead to full-fledged addiction, so it is important to be truly honest with oneself about the severity of the situation.

Getting information is the first step in considering treatment for yourself or anyone else. It is not mandatory to call an opioid hotline, but the information you receive might change your or your loved one’s life. The important thing to remember is that calling a hotline number is entirely confidential, and you will speak with someone who understands your situation and will not be judgemental.

A hotline may provide the following information:

  • The different types of therapeutic settings available and how to choose the right one.
  • The successful track record of opioid treatment and benefits of sobriety.
  • What might happen during detox from heroin or other types of opioids.
  • What medications might be prescribed, if any.
  • What different types of treatments may be available.
  • Data on opiate abuse in general.

Calling an Opioid Helpline: What Questions to Expect

Because of the stigma associated with opioid use and addiction, many people seem unable to tell their friends, coworkers, and family members about their addiction. An opioid hotline is like a supportive, knowledgeable, and non-judgmental friend who can guide you in the right direction to get help or simply listen to your concerns.

It can be intimidating to call an opioid helpline, particularly if it is your first time. It is helpful to be aware of some of the questions that the compassionate and supportive advisors may ask, such as:

  • What type(s) of opioids do you take?
  • How long have you been on the medication?
  • How long do you take the medication?
  • Are your friends and family members aware of your problem?
  • Do you suffer from any co-occurring mental health issues?
  • Have you ever sought help for opioid addiction?
  • Do you take any other medications besides opioids?
  • Are you ready to begin opioid addiction treatment?

You are not obligated to answer any questions that are uncomfortable to you. However, the more details you give to the opioid hotline, the more useful information and services you will have access to, including local opioid addiction treatment programs in your area.

How to Find Nearby Opioid Rehab?

When looking for an opioid addiction treatment center, it is important to consider several factors before choosing a rehab, such as:

  • Finding a treatment facility that suits your or your loved one’s individual needs.
  • Learning how treatment can help you or your loved one with opioid addiction.
  • Thinking about the cost and how you’ll pay for it (insurance, sliding-scale, or financing).
  • Finding a treatment center with qualified staff.
  • Making sure that the staff will assist you or your loved one with relapse prevention and after-care.
  • Considering the rehabilitation center location.

One of the easiest ways to obtain all the necessary information is to call an opioid addiction hotline. A representative would gladly help you and provide all the necessary information and they can check your benefits while you are on the phone.

In case you are not sure if you or your loved one are covered by your insurance, American Addiction Centers and Treatment Solutions can verify your insurance coverage for you. All you need to do is to fill out the form with the required information and see immediately if you have the appropriate coverage. American Addiction Centers have treatment centers spread across the US specializing in quality care.

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions

  • If you want to speak to a friend or family member about opioid addiction, keep in mind that a non-judgmental and cautious approach might be most beneficial. Concentrate on the following three points:2

    • Use statements that begin with the letter “I.” That way you can prevent accusatory language by framing the conversation around how their addiction affects you.
    • Focus on the wellbeing of a friend or loved one: Focusing on your concern for the person’s welfare will enable you to express your concerns without appearing angry.
    • Focus on the consequences of addiction: Focusing the conversation on the disease’s consequences will help to isolate the individual from the addiction and provide insight.

    However, if you are not sure how to talk to a user, it is always better to call a hotline and seek guidance. The hotline representatives will give you all the necessary information and help. It is important to know that in some situations it would be wise to consider seeking help from a trusted interventionist rather than attempting to do it on your own.

  • Opioids are a class of drugs derived from the opium poppy plant. Some prescription opioids are produced directly from the plant, while others are created in laboratories using the same chemical structure.3

    Opioids are often used as pain relievers because they contain chemicals that relax the body. They may make people feel relaxed and “high,” which is why they’re often used for non-medical purposes. Since opioids are highly addictive, overdoses and deaths are common.3

    The chronic use of opioids that induces clinically relevant distress or disability is referred to as opioid use disorder. Opioid use disorders affect over 16 million people globally, including 2.1 million in the United States, and opioids are responsible for over 120,000 deaths per year. Morphine, codeine, fentanyl, and synthetic opioids, like oxycodone, are examples of opioids. Heroin is a drug classified as an opioid.4

    Symptoms of opioid use disorder are:4

    • An overpowering compulsion to use opioids.
    • Increased opioid tolerance.
    • Withdrawal syndrome when discontinued.

  • Opioid addiction hotlines are both free and confidential. The majority of them are available at all times, 24/7. These hotlines, including ours, are dedicated to providing you with help and support when you need it.

    Without your permission, no information you provide while on the phone with a representative will be shared with anyone.


 

 

1. Medline Plus. U.S. National Library of Medicine. (2020). Opioid Misuse and Addiction.

2. National Institute on Drug Abuse (2020). Words Matter: Preferred Language for Talking About Addiction.

3. Johns Hopkins Medicine. (2020). Opioid Addiction: Signs of Opioid Abuse.

4. National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2020). Prescription Opioids DrugFacts.

5. Dydyk, A.M., Gupta, M., Jain, N.K. (2020). Opioid Use Disorder.